Thursday, 1 October 2009

Ludicrous Censorship in The Guardian

The Guardian today has an article on Turkey's rapprochement with Syria. Not a lot to it, although it's certainly of interest that Turkey now has visa-free travel with its neighbours Iran, Iraq and Syria. The article mentions the "zero problems with neighbours" policy of Turkey's foreign minister, Ahmet Davutoglu.

I entered the following comment to the article using the Guardian comments system:

"The Turks will pretend to play nice with their neighbours while they pursue their dream of getting into the European Union. Then, once the citadel gates are thrown open, if that nightmare ever occurs, they will allow their true nature to express itself again."

A fairly innocuous remark, which, amazingly, was censored out of existence by The Guardian censor team. It's heart-breaking to see what The Guardian has become under its censorship policy: a place where the free exchange of ideas is abhorred.

Fortunately, SideWiki, a new tool from Google, offers us a solution. After installing the Google toolbar, it allows you to enter comments on any website you visit. These will be visible to anyone else who uses SideWiki and will be immune from the censorship of those who operate the site. Not many people are using SideWiki yet, but I'm sure its popularity will grow, aided by the clownish thought police so many websites now employ. It is a particularly useful resource for those who take unorthodox positions and wish to challenge the status quo. Please download Sidewiki and start using it today.

2 comments:

  1. "Armenians anxious over Turkish plan "

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/8293896.stm

    ReplyDelete
  2. "Turkish court rules Nobel Laureate Panuk can be sued for comments"

    http://www.monstersandcritics.com/news/europe/news/article_1505615.php/Turkish-court-rules-Nobel-Laureate-Pamuk-can-be-sued-for-comments

    ReplyDelete